And then they wonder why we think they are nuts

Seriously, if you don’t want the west to get incredulous with you, don’t do #$@& like this. Death? For naming a teddy bear Mohammed? Setting aside the fact that the Teddy Bear itself is named after one this nation’s best regarded presidents, or that Winnie the Pooh is named after one Winston Churchill. Do you really think anyone would get this upset if someone named a stuffed toy Jesus Christ (Brendan might even have one so named). I mean, even the most religiously conservative Christian Nation you could find wouldn’t call for death in a case like this, would they? I mean the worst case scenario would be you get told it’s insensitive to name the toy Jesus and you’d be asked to change it. And heck, people drink umbrella drinks from buddha cups and nobody seems to get particularly offended by this–even though consuming intoxicants violates one of the Buddhist’s five precepts. Okay, I’m done grumbling…

19 Responses to “And then they wonder why we think they are nuts”

  1. Angrier and Angrier says:

    It’s behavior like this that will guarantee radical Islam will never be the global threat people want to make it out to be. I think this kind of mindless brutality is contributing to the demise Al Qaeda’s influence.

  2. yea says:

    if you live in sudan you live by there rules. obviously calling for execution is ridiculous, but the outrage shouldnt be suprising considering that its a totally different culture over there.

    people who use incidents like this to justify our continued occipation in the middle east and to justify other foreign policy decisions are not really getting it in my opinion.

  3. Anonymous says:

    did he use it to justify our “continued occupationin the middle east” or to “justify other foreign policy decisions”? Nope.

    Maybe you’re just not ‘getting it’

  4. Angrier and Angrier says:

    “but the outrage shouldnt be suprising considering that its a totally different culture over there.”

    This has as much to do with Sudanese culture as the Nazis killing the Jews had to do with German culture. This is fanaticism fueled by a brutal civil war, not “culture.”

  5. dcl says:

    I’m not trying to justify any foreign policy decision. I’m calling these people morally bankrupt, intolerant, and insane. And I am saying their (by the way, it’s their not there yea) rules are part of the reason they are viewed the way they are by the rest of the world. These are the people that brought you Darfur after all. And it is this type of thinking that leads to a woman receiving a punishment of 200 lashes (read that death) for being raped in Saudi Arabia. Anyone who could possibly even dream of condoning such behavior is a moral midget and is deserving of contempt. It is fairly plain to me that cultural sensitivity ends at morally repugnant actions. I will mostly avoid the tangent of talking about religion here but I will say that when you use your religion to justify the morally repugnant you deserve condemnation and if your religion does actually call for said behavior it too deserves condemnation as morally repugnant and it does not matter what the religion in question is.

    Of course if you want to talk foreign policy, I’m of the opinion we should become energy independent.

  6. Joe Mama says:

    Of course if you want to talk foreign policy, I’m of the opinion we should become energy independent.

    Is simply becoming energy independent what passes for a foreign policy nowadays? I mean, becoming energy independent is a good thing in itself, and would likely simplify foreign policy with respect to the Middle East a great deal to our benefit, but the question of what our foreign policy should be towards the Middle East seems a bit more complex. For starters, what should that policy be until we become energy independent? And should it be the same for each Middle Eastern country, or are there differences between those countries that would require treating them differently in certain respects?

    Saying our foreign policy should be energy independence is like saying our energy policy should be conservation — yeah, that’s part of it, but certainly not all or even much of it.

  7. yea says:

    take it easy folks, i was speaking in a generality, and i thought that was pretty clear from my comment but apparantly it wasn’t. i was not adressing my comment at anyone here in particular.

  8. yea says:

    dcl,

    who are those “people” that you are referring to, because it is not at all clear in your post.

    on a different note america has its share of crazies too including leaders on the religious right who think that concessions to the gay culture led to 9/11, people that think we should turn the middle east into a parking lot, people that blow up buildings in oaklahoma city, people that give ann coulter and people like her a platform to spew hate, etc. etc. etc.

    my overall point is that isolating the extremists in any society make it convenient to form overarching judgements against the populations as a whole, and that these judgments are used to fuel certain policy decisions.

  9. Angrier and Angrier says:

    I would like to point out that people seem to be more upset about Sudan doing this than Saudi Arabia – supposedly an ally of the U.S. – flogging a woman 200 times for being the VICTIM of rape.

    What good is having so-called influence with Saudi Arabia if we don’t use it to stop things like this from happening.

  10. kg2v says:

    Folks:

    SHE did not name the bear

    The KIDS in the class VOTED for the name

    The should be calling for the death of the children….

    ….crickets…

  11. JO says:

    my overall point is that isolating the extremists in any society make it convenient to form overarching judgements against the populations as a whole, and that these judgments are used to fuel certain policy decisions

    Radical Islamofascists are calling for the death (probably by beheading) of a woman for allowing her students to name a stuffed animal Mo. If my “overarching judgement” is that these said Islamofascists need to be eradicated from the planet because they are totally and utterly insane, then I’m all for any foreign policy that drives that goal.

  12. yea says:

    It is impossible to eradicate the islamofacists that you speak of without killing thousands or more innocents, spending billions of dollars, spreading our military thin, ruining america’s reputation world wide with our acts of aggresion, and without creating more islamofacists as desperate moderates become extremists as they see their countires being destroyed and looted by american interests.

    Yea, these protestors are probably insane but who really cares? On the grand scale of things this is pretty meaningless and is hardly indicitive of anything on a larger scale. perhaps the most important thing to learn from this is that if you ever visit a country with an islamic government make sure you play by their rules.

  13. yea says:

    to followup, i think language that calls for “eradicating” people off of the planet isn’t helpful to anyone. i think that getting at the underlying causes of islamofacism (extreme poverty, repressive governments, us presence, among many many many others) is much more productive than calling for people to be eradicated.

  14. David K. says:

    On the grand scale of things this is pretty meaningless and is hardly indicitive of anything on a larger scale.

    Besides on a cosmic scale our existence barely register! </sarcasm>

  15. Angrier and Angrier says:

    I love the term “Islamofascist.” It is the whole cloth creation of neo-cons who want to portray Al Qaeda as some vast army capable of marching through Western Civilization like the Nazis.

    What is really going on here is you have a death cult named Al Qaeda that is exploiting fringe groups of religious fanatics to try to topple governments in the Middle East, which isn’t working. The only government that has been toppled and taken over by religious militants has been Iraq…because WE did the toppling, not Al Qaeda and not “Islamofascists”.

  16. Alasdair says:

    A&A – Islamofascist is as good as any, since Thuggee and Hashsishin have already been used …

    If you take just a teensy look back through history, prior to 600 AD, there were NO Islamic states … since then, the Islamic countries became Islamic because their governments were overthrown by Islamists …

    Unless I’m mistaken, within recent memory, Iran’s government was toppled and taken over by religious militants, for example …

  17. Mad Max, Esquire says:

    “If you take just a teensy look back through history, prior to 600 AD, there were NO Islamic states … since then, the Islamic countries became Islamic because their governments were overthrown by Islamists …”

    …Actually, most of those states became Islamic because the ruling monarch adopting Islam to pacify the population, much like the Roman Empire and most European leaders adopted Christianity to appease Christians.

    However, I don’t see how Islam is the same as this so-called Islamo-facism (or Iran’s government for that matter).

    I agree with A&A. There is no Islamo-facist movement. There are a bunch of warloads and thugs trying exploit Islamic fanaticism for their own personal gains. That is why you have radical Sunnis killing radical Shi’ites and groups like the Taliban who are seen as pariahs even within most of the Muslim world.

  18. Sean says:

    Here’s what makes it even more insane. They named the bear after a *student in the class* named Mohammed.

    I personally like the term Muslim theocrats, since, um, that’s what they are. Fascism is a specific form of totalitarianism that came out of Italy – named after a Roman symbol of power called the fasces – and based itself mostly around uniting corporations with the state. The term Islamofascism is just an American invention with no real bearing on reality, about as relevant as calling somebody a Feminazi.

    And no, just because I don’t like a term doesn’t mean I don’t understand the threat of insane authoritarians, so save the faux outrage.

  19. Sean says:

    Alasdair, Thuggees were Hindu.