Mmm… calamari iPhone

As long as I’m at the Apple Store (for reasons I’ll elucidate in a new post later), I might as well point out Apple’s new TV ads for the iPhone, which comes out on June 29. I think this is the coolest one:

Will any of y’all be buying an iPhone? I won’t, because a) I can’t afford it, b) I’m under contract with Sprint until next May, and c) as cool as it looks, I’m skeptical of whether the touchscreen with no tactile feedback would work for me. Besides, I figure it’s better to wait until the initial kinks have been worked out. I’m sure iPhone ’08 or iPhone ’09 will be even cooler. :)

18 Responses to “Mmm… calamari iPhone”

  1. David K. says:

    I have been with at&t Cingular AT&T for a few years now, and my contract runs out in November. I’m highly considering one, especially since i haven’t as yet bought an iPod either.

  2. Lisa says:

    I’m with you on (c). I can barely stand the keypad on my Razr. I need keys I can really feel! Oh, and (a) applies to me too.

  3. Andrew says:

    What, Brendan waiting until a later model year rather than rushing out to buy the initial release? That’s unheard of!

  4. marty west says:

    i am anti over the top cell phone technology…

    but i’m not going to lie…the iphone is SICK

    i am stuck in a death trap contract with t-mobile though…and i hate my phone

  5. Mad Max, Esquire says:

    I plan to get one in the next month or so. My Treo has gone to shit and if I have to pay out the ass for a replacement, might as well be an iPhone.

  6. marty west says:

    buying now would be smart because i am sure the initial offering will have ton of discounts and rebates…

  7. DFens says:

    While we’re on the topic, I can’t believe that cell phone contracts are legal. I give a plus/minus of five years before some launches a successfull challenge in court, and they become history.

  8. DFens says:

    By plus/minus, of course, I mean over/under. And by “some” I mean “someone”. Damn lack of edit feature.

  9. Brendan Loy says:

    Not to mention the extra “l” in “successfull.” :) Heh, it’s good to be the king — of the blog, that is — so I can fix my own typos in my comments. :)

    Anyway, on what basis do you see cell-phone contracts being ruled illegal? Lack of informed consent? They’re usually pretty clear about it. Unconscionability? Maybe in the Ninth Circuit :) but I doubt anywhere else. It’s not like there aren’t no-contract alternatives on the market, so you can’t even claim some sort of monopoly or lack of meaningful consumer choice. I don’t like cell-phone contracts any more than the next guy, but unless there’s some good justification I’m not thinking of, I would be totally opposed to their abolishment by fiat of some activist judge. Freedom of contract, baby!

  10. Brendan Loy says:

    What, Brendan waiting until a later model year rather than rushing out to buy the initial release? That’s unheard of!

    Actually, considering I’m still the proud owner of a PowerBook — not a MacBook Pro — I’d say it’s quite, uh, heard of. :) Especially considering I bought the PowerBook within the 14-day window where I technically could have (immediately upon returning from my honeymoon) returned it and bought a MacBook Pro. But I decided not to because I figured the first model might be a little wonky, and more importantly, I was just so sick of switching computers by that point that it wasn’t worth the hassle (if you recall, I’d had my 12-inch PowerBook stolen in late November, went through two defective 15-inch PowerBooks in November and December, and finally got the 17-incher on January 1). I sort of half-regret my decision now, but not entirely… and when I finally do upgrade to a MacBook Pro, it’ll be totally awesome. :)

  11. DFens says:

    Re: cell phone contracts, I don’t have the expertise in law to argue this properly, but I’ll try.

    Basically, I think that the average consumer is unaware of the rights and privleges that they are signing away by committing themselves to one of these contracts. I could see a judge buying the fact that big flashy advertisements distracted such and such a customer to the point that they would sign any contract put in front of them, and that they were therefore “coerced” into doing so.

    For example, say I dropped a million dollars in cash in front of someone, and then told them to sign a piece of paper that had a lot of fine print that stated, more or less, that they would become my personal butler. I can’t imagine that that contract would hold up in court, given the trickery I use to obtain it.

    That’s an extreme example, of course, but that doesn’t mean that someone, somewhere, won’t see cell phone contracts in the same light.

    I’m not saying it’s right, but I didn’t think that Blockbuster late fees were such a big deal, either. There are already so many people trying to worm their way out of their contracts, I can see a big court case developing sometime soon.

  12. Vicki from NJ says:

    I’m not going to lie. I want the iphone and I want it bad. Luckily I’m with ATT so that’s not a problem, I also happen to loathe my razr like nothing I’ve ever loathed before so it’s not like I’d be upset about getting rid of a phone that’s only a little over a year old. Money is obviously my main issue, but with my birthday gift money burning a hole in my bank account, I think I may just allow myself to give in to the ridiculous urge to have something shiny, new, and really REALLY redundant (as I have lucked into having 3 ipods – my parents NEVER use theirs so I do)

    But then again, I don’t know if I could really spend that much on a phone?! So I’m confused and would prefer if someone just made the decision for me… So, what do you all think I should do???

  13. David K. says:

    Sell a couple of the iPods and put that towards the cost, it should help make the decision easier :)

  14. dcl says:

    well, there is lack of consumer choice through a d facto collusion of contracts–that is they are all the same, and all highly anti-comsumer. But you would have to find some way to prove some sort of anti consumer monopolistic business practice to get that one through. What pisses me off about Verizon is that in order to just change my plan I have to sign a new contract. That has got to be the stupidest thing in the world. How much of a moron do they take me for, I’m not going to sign one of these insane contracts for nothing at all… You are at least going to give me a cell phone equal in value to your termination fee for free if I’m going to do that… [redacted for family blog purposes]…

  15. DFens says:

    It’s a tough issue, but, then again, what other service provider out there forces you into long-term contracts in order to get their best rates? The land-line long distance and cable companies wouldn’t stand a chance trying to pull a stunt like that.

    If contracts were banned, you can bet that the cell phone companies will warn us all that they’ll have to start charging higher rates…and then go with the same rates they had under the contracts to begin with. I guess that’s where the “collusion” argument could come into play.

  16. Mike says:

    “well, there is lack of consumer choice through a d facto collusion of contracts–that is they are all the same, and all highly anti-comsumer. [sic]”

    Incorrect. Alltell, for instance, advertises heavily on the fact that under their coverage you can switch plans from one month to the next without signing a new contract.

    “It’s a tough issue, but, then again, what other service provider out there forces you into long-term contracts in order to get their best rates? The land-line long distance and cable companies wouldn’t stand a chance trying to pull a stunt like that.

    How about Comcast, which locks you in for up to a year depending on which plan you pick for cable or internet in order to get the lowest rate they offer?

  17. Vicki from NJ says:

    Sell a couple of the iPods and put that towards the cost, it should help make the decision easier :)

    I would be even I am not brave enough to sell my parents’ iPods and keep the money (even if they never use them)… that would be really bad.

  18. David K. says:

    I would be even I am not brave enough to sell my parents’ iPods and keep the money (even if they never use them)… that would be really bad.

    Ahhh, i thought they had been given to you, not that you were just the only one using them. yes that might be a tad troublesome :)